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For immediate release: August 29, 2003

* Libertarian Futurist Society will announce the annual winners of the Prometheus Award on August 29 at the Toronto Worldcon. The awards will be presented at 4pm (tentatively scheduled to be held in room CC Summit).
* Terry Pratchett won this year's award for Best Novel for "Night Watch".
* Robert Heinlein's short story, "Requiem" won the Hall of Fame Award.

At its annual Worldcon award ceremony to be held on August 29 in Toronto, the Libertarian Futurist Society will present its annual Prometheus Award for Best Novel to Terry Pratchett's "Night Watch" (HarperCollins) and the award for Best Classic Fiction (the "Hall of Fame" award) to Robert Heinlein's short story "Requiem".

This will be Terry Pratchett's first Prometheus Award, though not his first nomination. His earlier novel "The Truth" was nominated in 2001.

Pratchett's novel is part of his Discworld series. With his usual tongue in cheek style, this novel focuses on what it takes to build a police force that will eventually be able control one of the most unruly cities in fiction. Watch Commander Sam Vimes chases after one of the most notorious killers in Ankh-Morpork, and winds up in a time vortex that takes him back to the days when young Sam Vimes first joined the watch. The older Vimes has to set in motion the beginnings of a revolution in police procedures or his beloved town will never become the thriving metropolis that the readers of the Discworld series have come to know.

The other finalists in the voting for the 2003 Prometheus Award were:
* Schild's Ladder, by Greg Egan (EOS/HarperCollins)
* Dark Light, by Ken MacLeod (TOR Books)
* Escape from Heaven, by J. Neil Schulman (Pulpless.com)
* The Haunted Air, by F. Paul Wilson (Forge Books)

Heinlein's short story tells of the man who made a fortune in a business that led to the development of the moon, but who never got a chance to go himself. He skirts laws and does whatever it takes to finally achieve his goal. Heinlein has won the Hall of Fame 5 times before: in 1983 for "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress", in 1987 for "Stranger in a Strange Land"; in 1996 for "Red Planet"; in 1997 for "Methuselah's Children", and in 1998 for "Time Enough for Love".

The other finalists for the Hall of Fame award were:

* A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
* That Hideous Strength, by C.S. Lewis
* It Can't Happen Here, Sinclair Lewis
* Lord of the Rings trilogy, J.R. Tolkien

The Prometheus awards for Best Novel, Best Classic Fiction (Hall of Fame) and (occasional) Special awards honor outstanding science fiction/fantasy that explores the possibilities of a free future, champions human rights (including personal and economic liberty), dramatizes the perennial conflict between individuals and coercive governments, or critiques the tragic consequences of abuse of power-- especially by the State.

The Prometheus Award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (lfs.org), was established in 1979, making it one of the most enduring awards after the Nebula and Hugo awards, and one of the oldest fan-based awards currently in sf. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the Prometheus Awards include a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

The Hall of Fame, established in 1983, focuses on older classic fiction, including novels, novellas, short stories, poems and plays. Past Hall of Fame award winners range from Robert Heinlein and Ayn Rand to Ray Bradbury and Ursula LeGuin.

Publishers who wish to submit novels published in 2003 for the 2004 Best Novel award should contact Michael Grossberg (614-236-5040, bestNovelChair@lfs.org, 3164 Plymouth Place, Columbus OH 43213), Chair of the LFS Prometheus Awards Best Novel Finalist judging committee.

Founded in 1982, the Libertarian Futurist Society sponsors the annual Prometheus Award and Prometheus Hall of Fame; publishes reviews, news and columns in the quarterly "Prometheus"; arranges annual awards ceremonies at the Worldcon, debates libertarian futurist issues (such as private space exploration); and provides fun and fellowship for libertarian-SF fans.

A list of past winners of LFS awards can be found on the LFS web site at www.lfs.org.

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